URBAN CHAOS
I just like the intersecting lines, shadows and random splashes of color. It reminds me of what someone once told me: You can’t understand life - you can only understand yourself.
Paul

URBAN CHAOS

I just like the intersecting lines, shadows and random splashes of color. It reminds me of what someone once told me: You can’t understand life - you can only understand yourself.

Paul

RED AND RUST
And, red chilli pepper lights.  How perfect.
Paul

RED AND RUST

And, red chilli pepper lights.  How perfect.

Paul

ONE LAST THING
(DETROIT)  Henry Ford said “You can have any color car you want as long as it is black”, and with that he introduced the concept of mass production, mass marketing, mass consumption and the disposable society.  So it is only fitting that Detroit became the disposable city.  In the 20’s and 30’s the city grew with immigration from the south to fill the jobs.  The Brewster Douglass Projects were the first projects in America.  Then the war came and bigger factories were needed - the abandonment of the city slowly started though no one saw it happening.  The disposable society - “grab what you need and drop what you don’t”. Eventually the factories left the city and left their buildings. Someone else’s problem.  Then the people with jobs left the city.  They all took their ability to pay taxes with them.  Someone else’s problem.  The projects were abandoned and there wasn’t even enough money to pull them down.
What was left were the people who couldn’t afford to leave. What moved in was corrupt government officials who lined their pockets with whatever was left.  Finally the prairie grass filled in the cracks. 
Today the towers of the Brewster Douglass Projects are finally coming down.  In the distance are new sports stadiums.  Where we go from here is everyone’s responsibility.  We can’t afford to keep dropping and running.  We need to turn to the frontier within and find a new way. Detroit was the first city to be disposed.  Will it be the last?
Paul

ONE LAST THING

(DETROIT)  Henry Ford said “You can have any color car you want as long as it is black”, and with that he introduced the concept of mass production, mass marketing, mass consumption and the disposable society.  So it is only fitting that Detroit became the disposable city.  In the 20’s and 30’s the city grew with immigration from the south to fill the jobs.  The Brewster Douglass Projects were the first projects in America.  Then the war came and bigger factories were needed - the abandonment of the city slowly started though no one saw it happening.  The disposable society - “grab what you need and drop what you don’t”. Eventually the factories left the city and left their buildings. Someone else’s problem.  Then the people with jobs left the city.  They all took their ability to pay taxes with them.  Someone else’s problem.  The projects were abandoned and there wasn’t even enough money to pull them down.

What was left were the people who couldn’t afford to leave. What moved in was corrupt government officials who lined their pockets with whatever was left.  Finally the prairie grass filled in the cracks. 

Today the towers of the Brewster Douglass Projects are finally coming down.  In the distance are new sports stadiums.  Where we go from here is everyone’s responsibility.  We can’t afford to keep dropping and running.  We need to turn to the frontier within and find a new way. Detroit was the first city to be disposed.  Will it be the last?

Paul

A MASTERPIECE
(DETROIT)  This is my last image from Detroit.  I have many more but will give this theme and town a rest.  A stunning piece of work on a wall in a back alley.  Drove down an alley behind buildings that equally vacant and lonely facing the street as the back lane.  I drove past a zombie like person pissing against a dumpster.  It was grim but I had seen a splash of color out of the corner of my eye and felt there was something worthwhile if I kept going deeper into the darkness.  A beautiful work of art - a child.  The weeds, the ever present red brick trying to fight its way out and a child.  This is Detroit - struggle, decay and beauty.   Enough said.
Paul

A MASTERPIECE

(DETROIT)  This is my last image from Detroit.  I have many more but will give this theme and town a rest.  A stunning piece of work on a wall in a back alley.  Drove down an alley behind buildings that equally vacant and lonely facing the street as the back lane.  I drove past a zombie like person pissing against a dumpster.  It was grim but I had seen a splash of color out of the corner of my eye and felt there was something worthwhile if I kept going deeper into the darkness.  A beautiful work of art - a child.  The weeds, the ever present red brick trying to fight its way out and a child.  This is Detroit - struggle, decay and beauty.   Enough said.

Paul

READ BETWEEN THE LINES
(DETROIT)  This was St Albertus School.  A place of learning.  Now you need to read between the lines in Detroit if you want to learn.  All the beauty and sadness is there.
Paul

READ BETWEEN THE LINES

(DETROIT)  This was St Albertus School.  A place of learning.  Now you need to read between the lines in Detroit if you want to learn.  All the beauty and sadness is there.

Paul

FUCKED UP
(DETROIT)  As I stated at the beginning of this photo project, I did not want to take “cheap shots” of Detroit and say…oh look at the mess.  But I do need to make a point.  There is a huge amount of destruction in Detroit.  Buildings decay is easy to catalogue, but the human waste is horrific too.  It is fucked up.  
This is the outside of what was a fairly modern downtown hospital.  I assume that this sofa was once in the hospital.  The doctors and staff are gone.  People in need are still around, making due with what has been left behind.  And the ever present prairie moves in.
Paul

FUCKED UP

(DETROIT)  As I stated at the beginning of this photo project, I did not want to take “cheap shots” of Detroit and say…oh look at the mess.  But I do need to make a point.  There is a huge amount of destruction in Detroit.  Buildings decay is easy to catalogue, but the human waste is horrific too.  It is fucked up.  

This is the outside of what was a fairly modern downtown hospital.  I assume that this sofa was once in the hospital.  The doctors and staff are gone.  People in need are still around, making due with what has been left behind.  And the ever present prairie moves in.

Paul

OMINOUS AND HOPEFUL
(DETROIT)  Ladder truck #21 in for repairs.  There is something about the white clouds and bits of blue sky that are hopeful in this shot.  And, at the same time something very ominous about the dark reflections in the windows.  Something is brewing.  There are very view ladder trucks in the city.  And when one is in the shop for repairs it means a difficult night.  On this day there were two ladder trucks out of commission.  
Paul

OMINOUS AND HOPEFUL

(DETROIT)  Ladder truck #21 in for repairs.  There is something about the white clouds and bits of blue sky that are hopeful in this shot.  And, at the same time something very ominous about the dark reflections in the windows.  Something is brewing.  There are very view ladder trucks in the city.  And when one is in the shop for repairs it means a difficult night.  On this day there were two ladder trucks out of commission.  

Paul

EVERYBODY’S LEAVING TOWN
(DETROIT)  It’s the only city in the US to grow beyond a population of over one million and then fall well below of it again.  It is kind of a “drop it and run” mentality.  Not unique to Detroit - just taken to its ultimate conclusion.
Paul

EVERYBODY’S LEAVING TOWN

(DETROIT)  It’s the only city in the US to grow beyond a population of over one million and then fall well below of it again.  It is kind of a “drop it and run” mentality.  Not unique to Detroit - just taken to its ultimate conclusion.

Paul

YAH YAH YAHWEH
(DETROIT)  The first thing that comes out of chaos is art.
Paul

YAH YAH YAHWEH

(DETROIT)  The first thing that comes out of chaos is art.

Paul

A STUDY OF SQUARES
(DETROIT)  This could be a shot from any American city and maybe that is the point.  It is comforting and scary that Detroit isn’t that different.
Paul

A STUDY OF SQUARES

(DETROIT)  This could be a shot from any American city and maybe that is the point.  It is comforting and scary that Detroit isn’t that different.

Paul